The Slogan T-shirt Tribe….

So the second Elizabethan age has not been without its fashion moments. The 50’s saw the 1st rebellion of teenagers who for the first time wore clothes that weren’t the same as thier parents, the freedom that we have now was unheard of.  The 1st fashion revolution began with the Teddy Boys and has never stopped growing, Every subculture began with the need of self expression.

The swinging 60’s saw the teenage dominance of fashion grow again with the mini skirt, with Mary Quant & Twiggy leading the way. The 70’s were Hippie Chic and a all love, peace and flower power and in stark contract Punk with DIY fashion and safety pins there design choice. 80’s saw women taking to the business world with Power Dressing. The 90’s was all Herion chic and saw a rise in body piercing and Tattoo’s. The noughties saw the influence of celebrities and throw away fashion influence our shopping habbits. 
From Biba to Ossie Clarke, Vivienne Westwood to Alexander McQueen, the most groundbreaking inspiring designers have emerged from the British Fashion Scene, I am not the only one in agreement, in the top French, Italian and American fashion house British designers are influencing fashion around the world .

From Carnaby Street in the 1960s to Glastonbury in the 2000s, the Queen’s country has led the world in street fashion. The slogan t-shirt has been around for literally decades, with the 1st being sold in London’s Kings Road by Mr Freedom. The designs have changed from Disney characters to shock political slogans such as “Destroy” designed by Vivienne Westwood and partner Malcolm McLaren, which they referred to as the ultimate punk-rock T-shirt. It was the 80’s that the slogan T-shirt reached saturation point because of Katharine Hamnett, dressed in a “58% Don’t Want Pershing” T-shirt, she was photographed shaking hands with the then prime minister Margaret Thatcher at a Downing Street reception for London fashion week designers in 1984. Her designs were copied world wide with megastars such as Wham wearing slogan T-shirts such as “Number One” and “Choose Life”, to “Frankie Says Relax”, “Just Do It” to J’Adore Dior. Sixty years ago, the slogan  T-shirt simply didn’t exist; now, there is one in most wardrobes. (Before you exclude yourself: what about that FCUK T-shirt you wear to do the gardening?)
Fashion has always been about communication, and the slogan T-shirt shows how communication has changed, wearing a slogan T-shirt is a modern form of tribal branding. We are less interested in listening to received wisdom (whether these be dress codes or expert analysis of the world around us) and more interested in telling the world what we think (by wearing a slogan T-shirt or by posting our views on social media).

In the last decade, as fashion has taken an ever more central position in pop culture, slogans have become increasingly self-referential: think of Carrie Bradshaw wearing a J’Adore Dior T-shirt in Sex and the City, and the designer name-dropping T-shirts with which Henry Holland made his name at London fashion week.

With the reasuregance in DIY fashion I think that slogan T-shirts will be around for decades to come, the sad thing is that the slogans of the 80’s would still be relevant today. These problems- Nuclear Weapons, World Hunger and Faminie are still around. I would wear a Katharine Hamnett design with pride.

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How To Dress Through The Ages.

So we all like finding that bargain piece down our local charity shop, that everyone asks “where did you get that from?” I love that smug feeling I get. But its not always easy to spot the diamond among the rough, so I though I’d share with you some tips on how to spot clothing from different era’s, so you can dress through the ages.

1940’s

French Women 1945
Women wearing dresses to resemble Allied flags- American, French, British & Russian 
Italian postcard of a bathing beauty, showing the transition from bare midriff to fully exposed belly button 1947.

In the 40’s with the WW2 going on the world saw the 1st mass use of man made fibers in clothing manufacturing. The classic 1940’s style is A-line skirts/dress, but mainly workforce and utility dress, there was a focus on DIY fashion with many articles on how to change a mans suit into a women’s suit. It was illegal to buy clothing from abroad, including Ireland which was a neutral country, in Britain when clothing rationing was going on, if you were caught you would get a serious fine.

1950’s

Couture Chanel 1950’s
Cristobal Balenciaga’s day dress  
Dior’s New Look 
The Teddy Boy’s

The 50’s saw a change in female dress after Dior’s New Look was unveiled in 1947. Following wartime measures in the 40’s women wanted to look feminine again. Designers such as Balenciaga, Laroche and Givenchy (the designer of the classic little black dress in Breakfast at Tiffany’s) were iconic in this era: they embraced feminine fashion and determined the looks of the decade.

Key features of the decade:
Pencil and full circle skirts
Sack and Sheath dresses
Empire lines, especially empire line LBD’s
The American influence, wide belts, gloves, hats, nipped in waists.
1960’s

1960’s Biba
Twiggy!


Trends from the 60s are well known for their wide-reaching influence on fashion. A revolution was approaching and fashion was extremely important among young people. This generation had more power and more money, and Britain — in particular London — was where everyone wanted to be for the most experimental clothes and accessories. Hemlines shortened and prints became ever bolder, inspiration was taken from music and a change in lifestyle. The 60s also saw the revival of Art Deco, with the opening of the famous Biba store.

Key features of the decade:
Miniskirts, shift dresses
Space age and psychedelic looks
Graphic lines and cut outs
Materials included PVC, chainmail, sheer and transparent fabrics, chiffon, hosiery and synthetic materials

1970’s

Westwood 1970’s 

The Sex Pistols 1975
1970’s colour blocking
Fashion in the 70s saw a wide variety of trends, from folk to disco to punk. The influence of disco was seen widely in fitted lycra clothing, flares and hotpants. For some, fashion became more natural, in line with a more ethical lifestyle. The hippy looks were reworked with a folksy feel. Hemlines fell and shapes and structures became more relaxed. Designers took inspiration from traditional crafts such as weaving, knitting and tapestry. Collaborations became more popular — designers such as Ossie Clark and Celia Birtwell worked together. And the famous designer Vivienne Westwood lead the punk movement.


Key features of the decade:
Disco (flares, hotpants, wraparounds) and punk looks
Folk style included blouses, frills, maxi skirts, floral prints, knits, lacing, patchwork and waistcoats
Eastern influences (kaftans, kimonos, prints)
Jumpsuits and bodystockings
Prints included florals, geometrics and stripes

1980’s
Power Dressing 
Adam Ant 
Madonna 
The New Romantics 
Dynasty
Fashion in the 80s took great influence from political changes. Anger over the economic depression was reflected in street style. But by the second half of the decade things were beginning to look up, and this was shown in the clothing. Two themes emerged: power dressing became popular among women as they became more dominant in the workforce — pencil skirts and shoulder padded power blazers reigned for working women — and 80s sportswear was important, with brands like Nike leading the way, and bright colours, neon shades and shellsuits gaining popularity.


Key features of the decade:
Power dressing- shoulder pads, suits, bright colours and black and white dogstooth
Streetwear- graphics, tartan, stripes, denim and leather.
The new romantics
Sports and dancewear influences
Body con (lycra was the main influence